Your Bravest Year Coaching 2018

As we come towards the end of 2018, the DevelopHer team have been reflecting on some of the amazing work we’ve done this year. One highlight (out of many!) for us included launching our Coaching Programme.

In March, DevelopHer & The Bravest Path came together to provide our community a 6-month coaching programme to live their ‘bravest self’ in 2018. In total, 18 participants out of a hundred applicants were selected to take part, to receive a combination of group and one-to-one coaching sessions on the ground-breaking research of Dr Brené Brown.

The program was designed to enable women to take steps to realise their aspirations and feel brave. Over the 6 months each participant was coached on the following topics:

  1. Personal Values
  2. How to be authentic and create connected relationships
  3. Building a more resilient and joyful you
  4. Overcoming perfectionism & practising self comparison
  5. Daring Greatly and Living BIG.

“This is a fantastic coaching program. They’ve helped me find myself, my values in turn truly live to my capabilities. I’ve also met a fantastic group of amazing and inspiring women in the industry, who I’m lucky enough to call my friends now.”
Omi Ducat, Coachee

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The Results:

As the 6-month coaching program came to and end in July, DevelopHer hosted a ‘Be Brave’ speakeasy sponsored by TransferWise, where each participant gave a 2 minute overview on what they learnt and what this journey meant to them infront of family, friends and the DevelopHer community. We also had Flora Coleman, Head of Government Relations at Transfer wise share her experience on finding a mentor, and how it was valuable to her.

After the event, we heard back from our participants and found that the coaching programme was able to provide a valuable support mechanism and give the ladies the opportunity to progress their career goals, feel more confident and make braver decisions.

  • 100% of participants were either extremely satisfied (71%) or satisifed (29%) with the program
  • 100% of participants believed they have now made braver decisions on a regular basis since starting the program
  • 94% of participants feel significantly more confident since starting the program
  • 94% of women believed this program helped progress their career goals
  • 24% of participants had received a promotion since starting program
  • 35% of participants had received a job offer or changed jobs since starting the program

“This coaching programme has had a huge impact on my life, and everyone deserves to know and benefit from Brené Brown’s powerful research. If you are debating whether to sign up and the thought of living bravely makes you nervous – this programme is what you need! Take a leap of faith, believe in yourself and the rest will follow. 
Phoebe Ashworth, Coachee

We are hugely thank you to all the ladies who were brave enough to apply for the programme and made themselves accountable of taking risks throughout the journey. A big thank you to Bravest Path for partnering with us to give our ladies a great coaching experience. And finally thank you to Transferwise for sponsoring the celebration speakeasy, Syzygy and Sprinklr for sponsoring the coaching meet up events and Qubit for sponsoring our kick off event.

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Considering if coaching is for you?

We asked Bethan Davies, our Bravest Path Coach in the DevelopHer Coaching Programme to give a few tips on whether coaching is right for your personal or career development.

What is coaching and how does it differ to mentoring?

Firstly, be clear if it’s a coach or a mentor you need.

Coaching differs to mentoring in that coaches do not offer advice or opinion. They trust that you are the expert on you, and by having a supportive and challenging partner you can co-design the best solution that will be the most effective and sustainable.
Mentoring is a relationship where often someone shares the benefit of their learning, and ultimately may advise you on what you should or could do. Mentoring can be very useful depending on the timing of your career, but may not always affect behavioural change and can create dependency on others. Coaches help people to think for themselves, by giving them a safe space and time to explore an issue, where the quality of their questions help challenge, reframe and help them form and take tangible actions on the output of thought. It builds courage, as the coachee develops self-trust to listen to themselves

What is the top tip you would give to someone looking for a coach?

When looking for a coach its important to try a few out to make sure you get the best “fit” for you. Coaching is like dating – you need to make sure the chemistry is right!

Request testimonials, and examples of where your coach has helped someone achieve their targets – credible coaches should be able to provide these and contacts to speak with further.

To ensure your success, take some time to reflect on what you would like to be different at the end of the coaching process, where are you now and how will you know when you’ve reached your goal? What does success look, feel or sound like to you? Coaching is not a cosy tea and chat, its an action and outcome orientated process where progress can be measured against your goals, and a coach provides the accountability to maximise your chances of making it happen.

What qualities do you feel people should look for when identifying the right coach for them?

Trust is critical. You need to feel safe and supported by your coach. They should challenge and provoke you. A little discomfort can be useful, as a skilled coach should be pushing the limits of your comfort zone and encouraging you to step into a place where true growth happens.  Someone that listens beneath the surface, to not only what you are saying, but what you are not saying is important. Your coach doesn’t need to be an expert in your industry or area, in fact often the best coaches have little to no knowledge about the subject, as it enables them to be truly unbiased and curious.

In order to get the most out of coaching;

  • Bring your most important topics and be clear on the outcomes you want
  • Be prepared to be fully open and honest with yourself and your coach
  • Allow time immediately before and after the coaching session to mentally prepare and reflect
  • Challenge yourself and be brave!
Coaching has the power to facilitate deep behavioural change, and if the motivation is there, can be a powerful and transformational experience to achieve the results you want.
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You can also read some of the personal journeys our coachees blogged during the 6 months for inspiration on whether coaching is for you:

 

Stop, Collaborate and Listen

There’s been a lot going on behind the scenes at DevelopHer over the past few weeks. We are building a new website, planning our launch party, autumn events, and continuing to build on our partnerships with some awesome UK and European initiatives.

We are committed to elevating women in technology and to pursue our mission of supporting women in professional, personal and political opportunities we’d like to expand our network. As firm fans of collaboration within the community we’ve grown great relationships with a number of organisations including Geek Girl Meetup, Blooming Founders, and Women Who Code and want to continue to seek out and partner with other organisations with similar values.

If you know of any other groups, initiatives or organisations you think we should get to know or events we should share, please put us in touch via developHer.org@gmail.com .

One of our newest partnerships is with SyncDevelopHER, an East Anglian initiative committed to promoting gender equality in technology. The awesome organisation is behind the DevelopHER Awards; showcasing the East Anglian technology industry’s leading female talent. The next Awards are in Ipswich on 30th November 2016 and tickets are available now . We’re excited to be working together with them and hope to partner on bringing their East Anglian based event to London in the near future.

Coming up we invite you to join us on 20th September at the prestigious Royal Geographical Society as we collaborate with WOW Talks bringing our mentoring experience to  WOW Talks:Women In Tech. Please use code developherwow2016 for £10 off.

As ever, to stay in the know for all things DevelopHer including our launch party please keep an eye on twitter and subscribe to our mailing list HERE.

Team DevelopHer

Welcome to DevelopHER

To our wonderful members,

We are extremely excited to announce that we’ll be launching under the new name DevelopHER, and will be partnering closely with StartHER in Paris as well as a number of other organisations supporting women in technology worldwide.

Thank you for bearing with us while we’ve taken the time to get our new community initiative right. We are as committed as we’ve ever been to elevating women in technology and will pursue our mission of giving women the same professional, personal and political opportunities as men.

We will be transparent about our plans for the future, finances, and team.

We are committed to you, and will always do what is best for you and our wider community.

We will welcome everyone – inclusive of all genders, experiences, and backgrounds. We are best when we work together.

DevelopHER events and programmes will start running in September and in the meantime please do reach out to us with any questions you might have.

Here’s to an incredibly bright future, we can’t wait to see you all again soon,

Team DevelopHER

 

Contact us:  Twitter , Facebook , Email

Girls in Tech goes to 10 Downing Street

When has there ever been close to 100 women filling the State Dining Room at 10 Downing Street?

When Joanna Shields, Girls in Tech and Inspiring Fifty partnered up to organise a mentoring session for 40 UK-based girls and 40 of the most influential women in European technology.

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Roundtable discussion in 10 Downing Street’s State Dining Room.

“I’m in a hurry to achieve everything” – said Neeles Kroes in her opening speech of the hour roundtable that preceded the mentoring session.

And indeed, Kroes’s feeling is not only true for herself (she is 70+!), but arguably for all the 90 women around the table discussing what Government can do to support women in the digital industry.

It is estimated that “there are less than 20% women on the FTSE 100 Board of Directors” (Camilla Ley Valentin, co-founder of Queue-it) and that it will take 70 years to see an equal number of female and male directors of FTSE 100 companies (Equalities and Human Rights Commission).

And yet, these unfortunate numbers fall far from describing the frustrating reality of those very women sitting at those boards of Directors. Barbara Labate, serial entrepreneur and CEO of Risparmiosuper, shared with the audience her exasperation at meetings with prospective investors alongside her co-founder where “they [investors] tend to think that I am the assistant!”.

Even one of our attendees, Sarah Rench, noticedwalking up the stairs in Downing Street surrounded by my fellow Girls in Tech, the black and white photographs of past Prime Ministers emphasised this point again. Baroness Margaret Thatcher’s portrait placed near the very top of the stairwell signified her recent tenure in the position, but also served as a reminder that she is the only female Prime Minister to date, and only in very recent British history.

In other words, the world seems to still be asking women: “What are you doing here?” writes Nandini Jamm, in a way to implicitly ask, “why bother? Why fight when all numbers are against you?”

A Roundtable of Influential Women to Break the Wall Down

These feelings are the very reason why Girls in Tech exists. Founded in 2007 in San Francisco, and since 2013 with an active local presence in London, Girls in Tech aims to raise the visibility of women in technology, entrepreneurship and innovation.

Through monthly engaging events with high-profile women speakers (also open to men!), Girls in Tech wants to lead a change in the way feminism has been fighting for its right: by moving away from the gender debate and going for a can-do/just-do attitude.

As Josephine Goube, co-MD, first to speak at the roundtable to present Girls in Tech to the room of female leaders said “we are here to raise the visibility of female role models and so to connect promising talents of tomorrow with today’s female leaders“.

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Europe’s Inspiring Fifty!

Contacted by the Inspiring Fifty to be partners of the event, Girls in Tech was honoured to select the ladies that would get in to be mentored. “We selected 40 girls out of hundreds of applications. We were overwhelmed by the quality. One more reason to make us feel that our mission at Girls in tech serves a need and a cause.”

Following the speech of Neelie Kroes, the other 40 women shared their own personal story and lessons learnt from experience, in hope to inspire the next generation present in the room to take action.

“This [what we have in this room] is girl power, and we need to put an end to constantly underestimating ourselves.” @NeelieKroesEU.

“It’s vital that we, as women, support one another. We all hold this responsibility” @joannashields

“We have to play as a team to move the lines in big corporations (@geraldine) and as such, set an example that empowers other women to enjoy fulfilling and beautiful jobs (@Lararouyres) because we need more women to shape the society of tomorrow (Lindsey of @WomensW4).”

There is nothing to stop women from taking a seat in the boardroom but themselves and the lack of examples may make it a little more difficult @josephinegoube. Still, in the words of Nicola Mendelsohn that day who quoted Eleanor Roosevelt, “You must do the things you think you cannot do”.

The Mentoring Session

And so, on that day, together we did. Joanna Shields closed the roundtable inviting mentors and mentees to begin the mentoring session – 10 minutes of one-on-one discussion between the most influential women in business and a select number of London’s promising women in tech talent.

From the buzz in the room, testimonials the Girls in Tech team captured on that day, and in the email that followed, the session was a success in many ways.

First, for many, it was “THE moment” they’d been waiting for to inspire their own career path and guide their way to success.

“In this room there was an overwhelming, unmistakable feeling of girl power. When I walked away I felt like I could do anything I wanted to do.” Jessica Wesley

“Learning from other people’s experiences and life stories takes the scary out of, and was one of the most insightful parts of the day” – Diana Lee

“The conversations I had during the mentoring session pushed me to start working towards the goals I have been considering, daydreaming about for a long time.”Eniko Tarkany-Szucs

Secondly, it was an occasion for leaders to transmit their knowledge and responsibility to the next generation of leaders or as Yolanda Blasco puts it, for Women Tech Leaders to Finish what Feminism Started.

“It was odd to hear women who are at the top of their game describing the same niggles that I feel… it shows that we’ve still got work to do, together.”Kirsty Joan

The event sent a strong message to the world that “women belong here” and are ready to fight for that to be the norm. 

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Current female tech leaders & the next generation, all together.

The day after the event, the BBC’s high-profile documentary, India’s Daughter, was broadcasted. It illustrates how Indian women are in physical danger every single day when they come home from work in the evening. In our digital age, it is difficult to be blind to what’s happening elsewhere for women.

The event set the example. It set the standards for the next generation and the illustration of what impact women can have when working together to foster gender equality. The event left room for influential women to share their story of how they made it happen to be accepted at the leadership position they are in; and inspire others to do so.

“It’s difficult to believe you can be something if you can’t see other people like yourself already being it.” – Chris O’Dell 

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Photo opportunities outside 10 Downing.

Girls in Tech was honoured to co-partner with the Prime Minister’s Office and bring along forty selected promising women leaders to be part of it. Let this not be a one off, but an ongoing series of events.

Girls in Tech will be back this spring with a leadership mentoring program. Watch this space for more info. You can already express interest in the program by filling out this form.

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Read more about this incredible and unique afternoon from our fellow blogging attendees:

Women Tech Leaders Ready to Finish what Feminism Started by Yolanda Blasco

Inspiring Fifty Women in Technology Roundtable Discussion and Mentoring Session with Girls in Tech by Sarah Rench

What I learnt from the Women at 10 Downing Street by Hannah Russell

Knocking on the door of Number 10 by Diana Lee

How an invitation to 10 Downing Street left me wanting more… by Laura Chung

My inspiring afternoon at Number 10 by Chris O’Dell

#inspiringfiftyno10 at 10 Downing Street by Lucie Kerley

Not Everyone Has #FeministFridays: What I Learned On 10 Downing Street by Nandini Jammi

Thank you again for sharing your thoughts and feelings about the fabulous experience, and we hope to see you soon.

Four million and counting

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As of this December, more than 4.4m people in the UK have completed the Hour of Code (HoC) – an initiative designed to encourage people to give coding a go in a fun one hour session. Girls in Tech was proud to be a key partner of the HoC this year.

When we first heard about HoC, it was immediately clear that this was a great initiative. It is such a simple idea, but addresses a highly complex problem. To do the hour learners just go to HourOfCode.com where they can do a free, fun one hour tutorial in a range of languages – from Scratch to Javascript. At the end of the hour, they’ve made something. In the UK, it’s delivered primarily through 700 partner schools. By leveraging the schools network, the HoC addresses three key problems with technical education:

1. Teacher training is difficult

It is difficult for ICT teachers to stay abreast of every new technology. The pace of change is so great, and teachers are hard pressed for time. As a result, many ICT teachers understandably lack the expertise to teach their students to code.

2. Coding isn’t seen as a tool for creating things

Many kids – and in particular girls – don’t appreciate that programming languages are a tool for making things, just like lego. The lag time between starting a typical course and creating a product means that many learners fall part way through.

3. Students lack technical role models

Most kids don’t know anyone who works in technology, and certainly not the cutting edge of web and mobile start ups. Too many want to be doctors or lawyers because those are the only professions they know. They need access to real or online mentors and communities to inspire them to look elsewhere.

Building on an hour to create our future female tech leaders

Girls in Tech believes passionately that these are issues that need to be addressed for the long term. It is for this reason that we are launching an exciting new online learning programme: Global Classroom.

The Global Classroom will deliver exciting online courses on development to communities of girls around the world. Starting on the 10th January, the first course  will teach front end web dev and lead girls through customising their own own Tumblr blog. It’s open to any girl aged 13 – 18 and is free. To enrol just click here, or ask us any questions on Facebook or Twitter.

Women’s Entrepreneurship Day with Virgin Startup

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What an amazing opportunity it was to work with Virgin Startup for their Women’s Entrepreneurship Day event on 19th November, as part of Global Entrepreneurship Week 2014.

The event took place at a beautiful, rustic location north of Old Street and had more than 100 existing and aspiring entrepreneurs. After chatting with many of the women in attendance, it was clear that most of them were primarily looking to connect with others and gain inspiration from others’ accomplishments.

Goodies for the event were even served up by business owners who had been through Virgin Startup’s programme themselves, a unique approach indeed. One such company was Dark Matters, dishing out fudgy, moist, chocolately chunks of oh-so-heavenly brownies.

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Mmmmmm! Anyway, back to the event…

We set up our own Girls in Tech stand, which attracted many interested women, keen to find out more about our mission and monthly events.

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The day was jam-packed with individual talks, including baby food mogul Annabel Karmel and founder of Ann Sumers, Jacqueline Gold, as well as panels with women representing big companies like Google and Ocado.

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Some of our favourite quotes from the day:

“Quit talking about it, just get on with it.” – Sharmadean Reid, founder of WAH Nails

“Don’t tell someone your idea and ask what they think about it, ask why they think it will fail.” – Annabel Karmel

“Think about why you got here and how you got here – and what difference you want to make. Everyone has a story.” – Business consultant Madeline McQueen

Finally, let’s not forget about the delicious lunch delivered by the lovely ladies behind Lunch Box London.

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It’s very clear from the events we run, plus those we run along with others, as well as the events we attend, that getting women together in a positive environment is the best way to bring empowerment to all. You can feel how the energy in the room lights everyone up, and everyone walks away with the tools they need to either improve their startup or get started on an idea they’ve been thinking about for a while.

Thank you again to Virgin Startup and everyone involved who made this amazing day possible. We cannot recommend Virgin Startup enough if you are looking for a business loan to get yourself started. They provide access to funding and mentoring, which you can find out more about here. We can’t wait to work together again!

Where are all the women?

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Taking a closer look at the lack of women speaker representation at Web Summit Dublin 2014 and other tech conferences, and what we can do to change this.

Written by: Josephine Goube and Lora Schellenberg

Last week, we attended Web Summit Dublin, a technology conference that has grown at a dazzling pace since its inaugural event in 2010. With 20,000 attendees, hundreds of speakers on 13 stages, and media like the CNBC, Financial Times and The Guardian, a gathering like this not only impacts the tech scene in Europe, but around the world.

Of the 120 speakers on the Central Stage, where the main action of the Web Summit took place (and reserved for the biggest leaders in the tech industry), a mere 17 (15%) of the speakers were women. 8 of those 17 were actually journalists, leaving just 9 women viewed as “tech leaders”.

One of the names causing the most buzz at the conference was actress and philanthropist Eva Longoria. Another woman speaker was supermodel Lily Cole. We can’t help but wonder, was the representation of these two more about their good looks or their accomplishments?

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We are entirely aware of this issue with tech conferences all over the world, which is the reason DevelopHer and other women in tech organisations exist in the first place. We want to make sure future tech conferences have more of a gender balance in terms of leadership. We want to help organisers find the best women who are more than willing to speak.

We’ve heard all the common excuses as to why there aren’t more women representing at tech conferences. Here are a few:

  • We can’t find women who are as credible as other male speakers in terms of contributions to technology
  • Many women aren’t interested in speaking because they lack the confidence
  • Women who have families at home aren’t available to give their extra time to speaking gigs
  • We don’t know where to find these women tech leaders

We want to do our part in helping increase women leadership representation at tech conferences. If you’re a woman interested in joining a network of women speakers, simply fill out this short form. That way, when we’re approached by conference organisers to give suggestions of women speakers, we’re readily able to do our part to help.