Let’s talk about money!

It’s never easy discussing how you can get more money from your manager, and we’ve all been in situations where we want to negotiate our salaries or ask for a promotion. However, for many of us, we find these conversations uncomfortable and it often is considered a taboo topic. Not to forget the misconceptions around talking about money, being considered a rude subject to talk about or even unladylike for women.

At DevelopHer we decided to break this taboo and hosted an event on the 19th June to encourage people to say “Let’s talk about money!”. We were pleased to be joined with Stefanie Sword-Williams, Founder of F*ck being humble who moderated a fantastic panel with Zoe Bayliss Wong, Director at Depop, Ben Martin, Senior Insights Director at One Four Zero and Josh Michielsen, Senior Software Engineer at Conde Nast International.

We were overwhelmed by the turnout and note taking during the event, with our members expressing their uneasiness about this topic. “I just don’t know how to ask for a pay rise”; “It would feel like begging if I ask for more money”; “I am worried how I would come across”.

The bottom line is that if we don’t ask for what we deserve, we would end up feeling under-valued, demotivated and unappreciated. But what would be the best way of doing it, and when would be the best time to request it in order to get the outcome that we are looking for? The evening at the “Let’s talk about money” event was packed with tips from our panellists, and here are some of the top ones:

  1. Prepare for the conversation – Always keep a record of your achievements, the value you have added and the impact you have made in the organisation. Remembering every achievement can be difficult, so keep a record once a week on your successes to help you remind you later. Zoe suggested creating an anonymous 360 feedback on Google forms and sending it your colleagues for feedback on ‘What are my strengths?’, ‘What should I be doing differently’ & ‘Where can I improve?’. The positive feedback on your strengths can help support your case on what you’ve succeeded and the value you bring to the company. Make sure that you have your achievements all prepared before the meeting, so you can present them to your boss with confidence.

  2. Pick the right moment – It has to be the right moment for you and your boss too. You need to feel good about having that conversation so make sure you practice beforehand. Ben mentioned the importance of knowing when your company is doing well, as asking for more money at difficult times for the business will only result in receiving a disappointing response. Likewise, asking your boss during a stressful time for them may result in them not giving you the attention you want for this conversation. Don’t have this conversation as part of your weekly catch up, set a calendar invite to specifically talk about your performance so your boss is also prepared for the meeting.

  3. Do your research – It is essential that you know how much you are asking for. When you set a target against how much you are asking for, it becomes easier to have a conversation about it. Josh mentioned websites such as Glassdoor and LinkedIn are great sources for checking salaries for your skillset. He also mentioned to think about the whole employment package, not just the salary e.g. are you willing to take a small salary cut to save a 1 hour commute with a new job? Quantifying these things can help make job offers more comparable.

  4. Be Objective – Bringing emotions into a conversation that you already find difficult would make it even more uncomfortable. So prepare and practice to not get emotional. Zoe mentioned focusing your conversation on “what I think is fair” as opposed to “what I deserve!”. Keep your language fact driven, graceful and objective. Identify the moments where you’ve increased X metric or saved the company this amount of money or time. Have your job description ready and show how you have gone beyond, show the facts.

  5. Give yourself time – Don’t react there and then if the conversation doesn’t go as you had in mind. Give yourself time to reflect, get over the emotions and decide what response would serve you best. It would be OK to go back and discuss it with your boss further to show that you are unhappy about the outcome however, when doing so make sure that you are in a good state of mind. Stefanie also reminded us that it’s very easy to read a ‘F*ck you’ expression or body language – be careful of your facial expressions when you hear something you don’t want.

  6. Have a plan B – Think about what you would do if your request for more money gets rejected. Ben suggests asking your manager what you need to do to get to the next level, and make notes so you have it written down so you don’t forget once you’ve had the conversation. Josh also mentioned to get in the habit of using ‘CYA – cover your arse’ and make sure you get everything in writing, so your conversations don’t end up being unpromised words.

    If you find your existing role doesn’t give you the desired skill sets you want to get promoted, Stef suggested creating a solution for yourself first e.g. build a team outside your role to show strong leadership skills. Otherwise start looking at your exit plan and ask yourself questions: why stay with the organisation if you are not getting what you deserve? Why not find another job and leave? Maybe you are currently gaining a good set of skills and experience that would benefit you in your next job, which are worth staying for. Or you just decide to stay because it’s personally not the right time to move. Knowing the “whys” would help you identify your reasons and plan accordingly.

Thank you to our speaker panelists on the night for all your insights. We also want to say a huge thank you to Thread for being a fantastic partner and hosting us for the evening.

If you’d like to attend more events like this in the future, sign up to our DevelopHer mailing list where you get first access to our next events.

Written by Marjan Parto Hamed, DevelopHer.

10 tips to make a positive impact on others

What does it mean to be a mentor?


Being a mentor can mean a lot of different things to people.
Ultimately you are being a trusted adviser, which involves making yourself available to support and advise someone when they need it, and delivering that support in a way that makes sense to them. A mentor is always trying to keep the persons’ best interests in mind.

Mentoring opportunities can vary, from one-on-one relationships that can last years to providing short-term on the spot mentoring (during a coffee catch up or a speed mentoring session).

You might already have your own personal mentoring style and readiness, but here are our top 10 tips to help make a positive impact on others.

  1. Agree on the expectation of the relationship

    Be very clear if you’re there to mentor for a one time only offering or if you’re open to being approached afterwards. If you’re only available for one session, try to be actionable with the advice you’re giving, so the mentee can feel like they got value from a short session. If you’re open to continuing the mentorship session then set realistic expectations on how much time you can give or how often you can meet.

  2. If a mentee is shy, initiate the conversation

    Not all mentees will be comfortable opening up to new mentors who they don’t know very well. Help make the mentees feel at ease, and if you see that their are insecure or struggling to ask their questions – initiate a conversation starter on identifying what their goal is:

    1. Ask them about their aspirations, short-term or long-term career goals.
    2. Ask them about their existing challenges, they’d like to overcome?
    3. Find out what they want and expect from you – get a good understanding if they want support, guidance, insight or personal stories.

  3. Don’t assume anything about your mentee – ask.

    Every person you mentor is different. We all have distinctive learning styles and career ambitions. Try and approach each mentorship differently. It’s easy to fall into stereotypes or not see a situation from another person’s perspective. Try not to expect everyone to progress at the same rate you did or immediately project expectations on your mentee based on your own desires or opinions.

    Instead it’s important to ask questions on the reality of where they are now. So you can help identify options for them.

  4. Be present and know when to wait before giving advice

    Becoming an active listener, shows you’ve made a conscious effort to really, truly pay attention to what your mentee is saying, rather than what you think you’re going to say next. You don’t always need to come up with something helpful right away, in fact, you may give more appropriate advice to the scenario if you listen closely, ask open questions to dig deeper and act as a sounding board.

  5. Offer constructive criticism

    Providing feedback constructively but effectively is important to ensuring mentees improve or progress. Help the mentee to identify what different options are open to them. This might include challenging how they currently do or think about something. Say what you think you mentee needs to hear from you, not what you think he or she might want to hear.

    There are also ways to deliver criticism without breaking their spirits, so try and be diplomatic and tactful when addressing concerns. Rather then only noting the mentees shortcomings or mistakes, point out their positive and offer guidance to improve. You can also draw from your own experiences on how you had a time you had a slip up and how you re-directed your attention to progress.

  6. Share your stories

    There’s no must-do guide for mentors. However the power of sharing your personal journey and stories can help give greater context to your mentees. Stories are a great way of teaching and keeping others engaged – especially when sharing times you’ve felt vulnerable or even failed. This can help create empathy because a story you have from your archives might relate to the battle they’re currently facing.

    Remember to keep the stories short and to the point, as the mentoring sessions are about your mentees not about yourself!

  7. Help them agree to set tasks or accountable actions

    Try and help stretch your mentee by giving them examples of actionable tasks or experiments they could try and test. This doesn’t mean your responsible for always providing concrete answers to their questions or scenarios. It may be as simple as providing suggestions, or agreeing on setting small goals together. However, by framing the conversation in a way that allows them to take steps going forward, can be hugely valuable for a mentees to feel they have gone away from the session with practical actions to implement straight away.   

  8. Try letting them come up with the conclusion themselves

    Recognise that it’s the mentee’s responsibility to oversee their own career path. As a result, you can try the ‘socratic method’ to mentoring. So carrying out a dialogue in which the goal is to get someone to arrive at the conclusion that you want themselves by simply asking them questions. If a person arrives at the conclusion on their own behalf then they’re much more likely to take the conclusion seriously. It’s an interesting way to stop people from feeling though they’ve being talked down to, but you’re still guiding them in the general direction. You might be surprised at how much difference it says “do you think that’s a good idea?” instead of saying “that’s not a good idea”.

    This is a great technique if you don’t know an answer to a question. Instead of making up a response to a question you’re not sure about, turn it back to your mentee. Ask them ‘so how would you do it’ – listen to their response and find ways to build on it with further questions or clarifications.

  9. Connect or intro them to others

    It can be common practice to hold your contacts close to your chest. However as a mentor, you’re there to spot how you can add value, and it might be through introducing them to people you know. Or sharing the resources you’ve found invaluable in your own career, and give them some inspiration or practical resources you think they can utilise.
    The right connections at the right time can instantly open new doors. Sometimes when you share what you have with others, you can get ten times the return back.

  10. Give the confidence they need

    A lot of mentees need a mentor because they don’t always believe in themselves. They might be stuck in a ‘rut’ or had faced a setback and need the motivation of others to go out and do it. Sometimes, it’s as straightforward as inspiring your mentee to move beyond their limited beliefs. Even when they face difficulties, try not to act like your mentee will never comprehend your guidance.  Have a optimistic outlook, respond positively and be an energy donor.

Written by Laura Chung, DevelopHer Co-founder.

How to get the most from mentoring

On the 3rd July, DevelopHer are hosting a Speed Mentoring session inviting our community members an opportunity to meet mentors in the tech, digital & entrepreneurship industry and receive on-the-spot mentoring advice.

The right mentor can provide valuable advice and experience based tips that can help a mentee reach heights that would have been impossible alone. However mentorship requires investment of time and energy from both the mentees and mentors; so what you get is only as valuable as what you put in.

To help our mentees attending on the night and any community members looking to make the most of the mentoring experience they embark on, we’ve put together some of DevelopHer’s top tips for a great mentoring session.

1. Be prepared and come asking the right questions

Actively shape the conversations to your potential mentor on the outcomes you want to achieve.

Too often, mentees know they want a mentorship but don’t know what they want out of it. During a speed mentoring, you’re limited on time – so you need to figure out what to focus on before the event or session. You’ll also build a more gratifying relationship with the mentor, when you’re thoughtfully prepared for advice.

Before you come to your mentoring session, do some prep work and come up with 5 guiding questions, based on what you want to accomplish to ask your mentor.

In order to focus on what types of questions consider the following before the session:

  • Consider what your short-term & long-term goals are to discuss with your mentor
  • Figure out what successful outcomes of mentoring will look like for you
  • Figure out the top 2-3 things you want to be able to address during the session
  • What are the challenges you are facing in your role? What stops you from doing this?
  • Are you considering a career transition – what do you think are the pros and cons?
  • What are the options/choices have you been thinking of?

One you know the outcomes you want to achieve from your session, figure out how you want to frame the questions based on what you want to achieve.

Below are example areas of how you could frame your conversation:

  • Stories – Consider if you want to ask your mentor a story from his or her career that will help you with your career.
    E.g. How did you land a role?
    Can you tell me when you have a difficult boss, how did you handle it?
    What’s the most important leadership lessons you’ve learnt & how is it valuable?


  • Situational  – Identify a challenging situation and share it with your mentor. Ask your mentor to act as a sounding board
    E.g. What advice can you offer on how I approach entering a leadership role? What should I consider if i’ve never had experience on leading a team?
    When trying to gain buy-in to implement a new program, what tactics have worked for you?


  • Skill-building – identify a skill you currently want to develop, and ask your mentor for advice or resources.
    E.g. How do you approach risk-taking?
    How can i become a more assertive negotiator?

2. Be curious and open to who you’re being mentored by.

The best mentors are the ones who can fill gaps in your skillset. You don’t have to seek a mentor who’s your clone.

During the Speed Mentoring, you’ll have access to approach directly to different types of mentors from different backgrounds / industries. And whilst mentors are a great way to help make your strengths even stronger, it’s also valuable to have someone who can give advice in areas where you’re struggling.

Consider speaking and approaching mentors that may also have different roles or background to you. These mentors can give valuable insight into a skill or situation that you may not have considered, plus may have also gone through similar experiences but in a different context. Each mentor may provide a different perspective – that can give you new ways of thinking.

3. You don’t always have to follow a mentor’s advice – but listen to it and evaluate it.

The role of a mentor is there to help you reflect, not to give you the answers.

Mentors can provide advice, perspective and make you think differently – but they will not make decisions for you. In this speed mentoring, carefully listen and considered the perspective, personal experiences or tips your mentors give you, then make sure you take the time to evaluate how you approach the situation yourself and if you think it’s appropriate to apply the advice. Constructive criticism may not always be easy to take in – know that you are learning, try to respect your mentor’s opinions and consider everything they say carefully.

Remember to bring a pen and notepad to take notes down. As speed mentoring sessions are short, write the advice down and come back to it later when you have the time to consider or evaluate the advice given to you.

4. Be grateful and keep in touch

Mentors are taking the time to help you under the goodness of their hearts.

Mentors don’t owe you anything, but they are taking the time, energy and investment to help others. It’s important to be grateful for the advice they give, and especially after you’ve found success.

Whilst DevelopHer can help provide you the opportunity for connections, you as a mentee are ultimately responsible for ensuring you keep the relationship going if you want to. Not all mentors during a speed mentoring session will have the time  to mentor you going forward, but some may certainly be open to it.

If you feel you found an authentic connection with a mentor you meet, ensure you follow up:

  1. Bring your business cards
  2. Ask for their business cards
  3. Add them on LinkedIn
  4. Follow up with a thank you email or note – sharing the key learnings & summarise the key actions you’re going to take
  5. If they’re available and willing, try and ask for a follow up session
  6. Or if the tips/advice they shared with you, worked for you. Don’t be afraid to send a follow up email thanking them and how you’ve found success.

See the list of our 2019 Speed Mentoring Mentors here.

Written by Laura Chung, DevelopHer Co-Founder

DEVELOPHER SUMMER SPEED MENTORING 2019

We are thrilled to announce that DevelopHer, will be hosting a Summer Speed Mentoring event on the 3rd July 2019. To encourage more women to reach the top, we truly believe in the power of mentoring and how providing a step up is vital in achieving your career goals. 

As part of our DevelopHer’s values, we want to provide our community accessibility to the tools they need to progress their careers, so we are excited to provide an opportunity for our community members to find and speak to mentors in their industry, create relationships with these mentors and gain on the spot advice and tips.

OVERVIEW:

The speed mentoring will welcome 60 people from the DevelopHer network. This will include 30-40 members (of all ages) of the community who want on-the-spot mentoring. On the night there will be 20-30 DevelopHer mentors to speak too (including senior figures in UK tech & women leaders). 

The whole event will take 2-3 hours, with the opportunity to network and meet up to 5-7 different mentors on the night. Please see the agenda of the event below.

We have a limited number of spaces available and a short application window so please apply for a spot by 6pm BST 12th June 2019

To apply for the speed mentoring opportunity pleasefill out the application form here. 

The mentoring session will cost £10. Once you’re application has been successful and confirmed – we will share an eventbrite link for you to purchase your ticket. Without the ticket purchase you will not be allowed in the event. 

Agenda:

  • 6.00pm – Welcome drinks
  • 6.30pm – Introductions & Keynote Speaker
  • 6.45 – 7.45pm – Up to Four 15 minute mentoring sessions
  • 7:45 –  8.00pm – Refreshments & break
  • 8:00 – 8:45pm –  Up to Three 15 minute mentoring sessions
  • 8:45pm – 9:30pm – Networking & Drinks

Venue: Syzygy HQ Rooftop, Holborn

Please note, not all mentors will meet with all mentees in this time frame. Based on the agenda every mentee will have a 10 minute break whilst we ensure there is a rotation of mentors during the session. Mentees will also have the opportunity to network with each other and enjoy the refreshments. 

What is mentoring?
Mentoring is a support system where one person shares their knowledge, skills and experience to assist others to progress in their own lives and careers.  The power of mentoring is more than ‘giving advice’, it’s about motivating and empowering the other person to identify their own issues and goals and help them to find ways of resolving or reaching them. As part mentoring, it includes respecting the different ways of working.
British Mentoring tends to include 3 key elements: career development, sharing knowledge and helping to improve performance. 

What is Speed Mentoring?
Speed mentoring is a series of short, focused conversations about specific questions. You will meet with a limited number of mentors in 15‐minute time slots each.  At the start and end of each Speed Mentoring round, a bell will ring. Mentees will then move on to the next mentor, and will be giving two minutes to switch and prepare for the next round. Not all mentors will meet with all mentees.

How do I apply?:
Please submit your application via the application form here.
You will need to include the following details below:

  • Full Name
  • Age (Over 18)
  • Profession or Current Role
  • 100 words (max) on why you would like to join us for the day and what you hope to gain from being mentored.
  • 1 example area you need help mentoring on (e.g. confidence, example of work situation, example of personal situation)
  • Email address (for DevelopHer to contact if your place is confirmed)

The application process is needed, as places are strictly limited and while we hope to be able to run future opportunities we are unable to accommodate the entire community in this instance.

The event will cost £10 for the evening. Once you place has been confirmed, you’ll need to purchase your ticket on the eventbrite page via the email.

Have questions? Read our FAQs here or contact us at laura@developher.org

Written by Laura Chung – Co-Founder of DevelopHer

What’s on – International Women’s Day events 2019

Written by Laura Chung – Co-Founder of DevelopHer

Next week is International Women’s Day, and this year’s theme is #balanceforbetter.

This day is celebrated globally around the world and recognises women for their achievements without regard to divisions, whether national, ethnic, linguistic, cultural, economic or political. Our view, as a community who believe in diversity and inclusion, is that it’s an opportunity for everyone to reflect on gender-based rights, past and present, and join in the conversation with a view to improving the future for all. With that in mind, we’ve rounded up some event ideas that are happening during the week so you can get involved in the activities and celebrations.

IWD LONDON WEEK EVENT GUIDE:

MONDAY 4th MARCH 2019:

Shaping a Sound with Serine Karthage
5.30pm – 6:30pm @Apple Covent Garden, London (FREE)

PUK Talk Inspiring Women – Caitlin Moran in conversation with Lauren Laverne
2;00pm – 5:30pm @ Curzon Cinema, Shaftesbury Avenue London (£99)

TUESDAY 5th MARCH 2019:

Learn why the Menopause is Everyone’s Business by Minds@Work
6:00pm – 9.30pm @ KPMG Canary Wharf, London (FREE)

My Mummy is a Soldier Book Launch by Butterfly Books
10:00am – 12:30am @ National Army Musuem, Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea (FREE)

Together Films Screening ‘The Judge’
Award Winning Documentary capturing the journey of Kholoud Al-Faqih, the first female judge appointed to the Middle East’s Shari’a (Islamic Law) Courts.
6:30pm – 9:00pm @ Huckletree, Wood Lane, London (FREE)

WEDNESDAY 6th MARCH 2019:

DevelopHer Workshop with LeWagon – Code & Build your own website landing page
6.00pm – 9.00pm @ Le Wagon, Haggerston London (£6 – Tickets required)

THURSDAY 7th MARCH 2019:

Women in Industry: Building Inclusive Teams for success 
8:30am -10:00am @ General Assembly, Whitechapel High Street, London (FREE)

The Empowerment of Balance
6:00pm to 8:00pm @ BoConcept, Tottenham Court Road, London (£20 tickets)

Women in Beer Showcase Launch Party: Points x Honest Brew
19:00pm -10:00pm @ The Pembury Tavern, London (£5.92 tickets)

Imperial Lates: Wonder Women
From tech talks to life in science and art, learn about incredible women in bitesize workshops.
6:00pm – 9:00pm, Imperial College London (FREE)

FRIDAY 8th MARCH 2019 – IWD’S DAY:

Breaking the Glass Ceiling by N.C productions
Inspirational stories of women overcoming adversity in their lives, sharing stories of domestic abuse, depression and near death experience.
7:00pm – 10:00pm Plough and Harrow (£10 tickets)

Future Leaders Forum by The Sister Sister Network
3pm – 5.30pm, SOAS University of London (FREE)

Bring Me In – Bridging the Gap by S+K Project Presents
Networking event designed to facilitate creative collabs between people of colour
6pm – 9pm, 17-19 Triton Street, Regents Place, London(FREE)

Guardian Live: The Guilty Feminist 
Join Deborah Frances White for live version of her podcast.
7pm – 9.45pm, Barbican, London (Tickets are £25)

Piano Recital of Women Composers
7pm – 9pm, Morley College London (£10)

Women by Women: Pop Up Portrait Studio
In collorabation with Appear Here and the Photocopy Club, 3 female photogrpahers are photographying as many women as possible – take home a free portrait of yourself.
11:00am – 6:00pm, 55 Duke Street, London (FREE)

COS YOU’RE FXCKIN WORTH IT – Female DJ sets & Performance from Miraa May
10pm @ The Curtain, London (doors open at 6:30pm)

Gal-dem presents Madison McFerrin
7pm – 10:30pm, The Jazz Café, London

Women in Focus Festival from 11:00 (FREE) Friday, Saturday and Sunday (8th-10th)
3 day festival open to all featuring performances, talks, workshops, discussions and film screenings

SATURDAY 9th MARCH 2019:

Women’s Event: Self Care for a Better You
Join for short talks, mediations, reflection and discussion on The art of emotional self care, loving and accepting yourself, recharging your soul and making yourself a priority.
2:00pm – 3:30pm, Covent Garden Community Centre, 42 Earlham Street (FREE)

MONDAY 11th MARCH 2019:

Women Techmakers  -Tech talks, networking and fireside chats by Google
4pm – 9:30pm, Google London (Tickets required)

If you have any events you’d like to see here, please message laura@developher.org with the details.

Re-booting Your Personal Brand

Written by Sally Freeman – Co-Founder of DevelopHer

The idea for reboot your personal brand came from the thought that I had, that it is often much easier to rebrand for companies and organisations than for ourselves. I work in social media and branding and have often spent weeks and months on one project. So the challenge was, new year, new you, on a cold January evening, what could we achieve with 50 people in two hours? Could we help attendees reboot their personal image and help them achieve their goals for 2019? Could we potentially help them get their dream job and help create new opportunities in this new year?

The tickets went on sale and sold out in a day. The DevelopHerUK community clearly love this type of event and we realised it is much needed.

With a speed dating type feel, our attendees had half an hour with four amazing professionals to give each attendee skills to help them reboot their own brand. Including sessions on:

  1. Having a professional photograph taken to be used on CV’s, LinkedIn & Social.
  2. CV Workshop
  3. How to make your LinkedIn account stand out from the crowd
  4. How to pitch and communicate yourself in 45 seconds

“A picture is worth a thousand words”
Sue Lacey from http://www.Suelaceyphotography.com

Meeting the Experts

Sue Lacey specialises in business portraiture and knows it is essential to have an excellent business image. Sue captured the attendees in a way to show their character and personality.  An absolutel essential element for Linkedin to social channels, a good business image communicates a strong message to clients. Our attendees have been over the moon with their new images and have instantly been used across their channels.

Maarit Lilley, luxury brand copywriter and PR helped attendees focus on the summary paragraph that is often used in the profile section of your CV or Linkedin.

Dani Barrett from Digitas is a self confessed Linkedin addict. She knows good Linkedin! Dani guided attendees through the do’s and don’ts of linked in, how to create unique URL’s and how to get noticed amongst hundreds of Linkedin profiles. Sharing her experience about what recruiters look for when they view a Linkedin profile was hugely useful to attendees. You need to make your linkedin profile stand out from the crowd.

So you have your picture, your CV and Linked in profile. What next? How do you convert this to real time conversations, be able to pitch yourself  and grow your network?

How do you pitch yourself in real time? You are in the lift with the new CEO, how do you say “ Hello, I am … this is what I do and I would love to come and speak to you about a new idea I have”.

GSB Comms, experts in presentation skills,  returned to give top skills in meeting new people, how to introduce yourself, pitch yourself and communicate that all essential elevator pitch in 15 seconds.  Richard and Freddie facilitated attendees giving top tips on body language, communication skills and how to make an impact when meeting new people in a networking environment. Everyone loved the role play in the safe environment of the Syzygy offices. Richard challenged us to communicate key aspects of who we are and what we do within 45 seconds.

Top Tips & Learnings:

How to write an outstanding CV from Maarit Lilley:

The Do’s

  • Be precise about the job you do and for how long you’ve been doing it.
  • Be clear about which sectors you’ve worked in and your experience.
  • Be concise.
  • Keep your introduction profile up to 5 sentences only.
  • List your key skills – up to 5 or 6, pinpoint your achievements and be bold.
    – Say what you worked on, how you got that skill, how you applied and what the great outcome is.
  • Claim your achievements and name drop well-known brands where you can.
    E.g. led a team across international markets, dealt with financial budgets.
  • You are not obliged to include age, marital status, kids or your nationality.
  • Claim your positive outcomes and how you met your targets.
  • Add in  just a few interests to show more of your personality.

The Don’ts

  • Don’t waffle, use long sentences, repeat yourself or use clichés.
  • Look out for typos and beware of using industry jargon and acronyms.
  • Avoid using the word ‘passion’ – passion belongs in the bedroom. Try using words such as deeply committed, enthusiastic.
  • Don’t let your CV be longer than 2 pages.

How to make your LinkedIn stand out for recruiters from Dani Barrett:

  • Keeping your profile up to date is essential, even if it’s as small as moving location.
  • When you’ve moved jobs, put the end date on your profile and add in your bio that you’re looking for opportunities.
  • When you’ve been promoted in the same role – always give a snapshot of what you’re doing now, and how it was different then before.
  • Create a customize URL – this looks better and cleaner when added to your CV.
  • Always put information under your job title – approx. 3-5 bullet points that are the most relevant, especially when you’ve had a promotion.
  • Once a week, start showing activity on LinkedIn. Share, like or comment on something you find interesting, this is the start of creating new networking processes – as your reach on LinkedIn can be greater then any other platform.
  • Don’t be scared to post and share your accomplishments and self-promote in an authentic manner – e.g. either a project you worked on, or thanking others for their contributions. Try and get into the habit of doing it once a month, or more if possible.
  • Use the promotions feature on LinkedIn, to let recruiters know you’re interested in a new role. Don’t worry, this won’t show up as visible to connections in your existing company.

How to sell yourself or build your own narrative from GSB comms:

  • Remember we think and remember things in a world of pictures.
    So when you’re explaining what your job role, make sure you’re describing rather then explaining. The stuff that sticks is often the description, so work on replacing some of the explanation of your role into a descriptive format.
    One book to read is ‘Made to stick’ by Chip and Dan Heath.
  • When describing what you do, simplify your terminology so that it’s easy to understand from anyone, whether they’re in your industry or not.
    e.g. Example 1 “I’m a merchant marketing manager for online financial payments”
    Instead try using example 2 “I help communicate to businesses how they can start getting paid online, so we can help these businesses grow their sales”.
  • Don’t kill your 15-40 second intro by saying at the end ‘yeah but it’s boring’ or ‘yeah it’s alright’. Don’t play yourself down, make sure you end your introduction on a positive. Otherwise people will disregard you straight away.
  • Body language has a huge impact on your passion. You don’t have to show your passion in what you do by over explaining or rambling on. In fact, expressing your smile and confidence in what you do in your body language can be more impactful then over-explaining.
  • Portraying energy may not always be how fast and loud you can something. Practice expressing your passion in a calm way – so that what you’re actually saying comes across easily to the receiver.

richard

Thank you to our expert team of communication professionals who gave of their time to DevelopHer so freely. Personally I have learnt how to speak through DevelopHer and this has facilitated me speaking at conferences all over the world.

The event was a huge success and we hope to run it again. We had lots of feedback about how enjoyable the event was and how our community enjoyed being with one another. Thank you to the amazing syzygy team who hosted us with delicious vegetarian and vegan food with lots of dry January soft drinks and wine. Thank you for logistics and general support of DevelopHer, we love to work with Syzygy London.

We would also like to thank Moo.com who gave us 20% off business cards. DevelopHer hope to repeat this successful event for those that didn’t get tickets first time around.

We hope we rebooted and kick started your 2019 and look forward to hearing your stories, please tweet us @developheruk or send us your success stories to hello@developher.org. See you at our next event.

Sally J Freeman

Co-Founder

DevelopHerUK

How to survive and live in high pressure work situations…can we have it all?

-Written by Laura, Anna & Sally, DevelopHer Board Members-

In January, DevelopHer board members Sally, Laura and Anna spoke at a fireside chat as part of GetaHead Wellness Week. The topic was on how to survive and live in high pressure work situations…and can we really have it all?
Although we’re not medical experts, we shared tips and advice on how we personally manage stress.

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Below are the highlights of what we spoke about it:

What is pressure and stress?

It’s all about how you respond under the constraint of certain circumstances. It might be how you respond and manage yourself in either a work context or personal context. Sometime the urgency of this situation can create strong attention or distress on yourself.

Stress can be an emotional, mental, physical strain or tension based on how you react to a demanding situation.

What does it mean to have it all?

  • Understand and identify what ‘having it all’ means to you. Having it all can depend on your where you are in your life and what is important to you at the time:
    • Based on the Bravest Path Brene Brown coaching programme that Laura and Anna joined, we learnt that’ having it all’ refers to achieving what our values in life are. A value is a way of being or believing what’s most most important to you. Knowing what your 5 values are, can help you live your life focusing on achieving your values. By achieving your values, you can live a more meaningful live. So if ‘having it all’ connects back to achieving your 5 values in life – then yes you can have it all.

What does stress feel like to you?

When noticing stress, the three of us get the following symptoms:

  • Weight and strain on my shoulders (Laura)
  • Stress-eating on sugary snacks or caffeine related (Laura & Sally)
  • Lack of clarity – can’t think straight (Laura)
  • Over-working and lack of attention to other people or activities (Laura)
  • Short fused – things get to me quickly (Laura)
  • Inability to sleep (Anna & Sally)
  • Inability to settle down – feeling weird when you have a few hours of quiet (Anna)
  • Loss of appetite (Anna)
  • Need for lots of sensory stimulation such as music (Anna)
  • Back pain (Sally and Laura)
  • Feeling like I have FOMO (Sally)
  • Rumination when I cannot resolve something – think of it over and over again

Laura mentioned that it’s important to notice these elements before you get burnout as she often notices different symptoms when facing burnout such as:

  • Anxiety
  • Unable to sleep
  • Change in mood, typically lack sense of energy/happiness
  • Losing confidence in my capabilities

DevelopHer Wellness event

How do you manage stress?

    • Identify which situations create the most stress to you, and how you respond to them. Think about tracking what causes you to be stressed or what makes you feel the tension when you’re under pressure. Knowing your own symptoms and when it happens, can help you think about the small changes you can look to implement to help manage it.
    • Establish boundaries on what you take on, how you respond to
      people/friends and saying ‘no’.

      • Anna – when working with other time zones: edit your calendar so people can’t book in meetings past 5:30pm. Only join late meetings if it’s an absolute priority.
      • Anna/Laura – I never do work on the weekend or at home. I try to keep it to the office so that when I get home, I can focus on other things. This also helps condition me to not think about work at home too.
      • Laura – Set time for yourself, even if it means saying no to a couple of social events! Ensure you take time to re-charge your batteries without other people being around you.
    • Take time to recharge – and incorporate into a routine. Practice and find out what allows you re-charge yourself.
      • Exercising, releasing natural endorphins
        • Anna –  I’m goal-oriented so setting  goals so that I have to exercise – half marathons and triathlons to work towards – means you need to exercise every week to get there
        • Laura – I try to set 20 mins three-four times a week to at a home HIIT session. I also go to dance once a week even if its a busy period. Make sure you exercise in a way that makes you happy and that will motivate you to do it again! I’m not a gym person, so I don’t kid myself!
        • Sally – I love dancing, swimming & pilates. I also make morning walks on the weekend with my dad  into a consistent routine.
      • Meditate and learn to be calm – e.g. using headspace app is a great way to start practicing mindfulness.
      • Every morning I listen to a podcast whilst I get ready for work (Laura)
        • I also love Oprahs supersoul conversations  and masterclasses podcasts, and getting curious with JVN (Sally).
      • Try and create an ‘artist date’ for yourself once a month or week. An artist date is solo adventure that I fully dedicate myself into for 2–3 hours e.g. going for a walk, reading a book, attending a class (Laura)
        • Sally loves the quote “time spent without purpose” by Brene Brown, give yourself space.
      • Do something that makes you feel good and energises you – Sally loves singing in groups
  • Maintain a healthy diet
      • Laura  – When I’m stressed I normally reach for high sugared snacks and caffeine based products. However it makes me feel quite low in energy and I lose control of when to stop. I try and food prep on Sundays to avoid going down the slippery slope during the week.
      • Anna – I try to eat what I want but in smaller portions, try not to be too restrictive so that I don’t think about eating – e.g. big lunch, very small dinner
      • Sally – I’m a fish eating vegetarian. I have always eaten healthy. I don’t drink much and don’t do drugs.
  • Keeping organised
      • Sally – I use a table diary and make lists. I also plan my day, the day before so I don’t wake up in a panic! Give yourself time to process.
      • Anna – Give yourself realistic deadlines, then add a few working days to when you think you can actually deliver something – its gives you less pressure.
      • Laura – Alongside to-do lists, I block out time in my calendar on individual tasks that I want to focus on – whether it’s for high priority tasks or self development, try and block it as a meeting in your diary.
      • Laura – I also colour coordinate my calendar, anything work or meeting related I colour it red. Anything personal that is time for myself, colour it green (even if its spending time to go for lunch or seeing friends). I try and make sure if my calendar is red, that I’ve put some green in there too to balance it out.
  • Letting go of your perfectionism
      • Laura – Avoid putting on self pressure by being too much of a perfectionism. Take 1-2 small steps each week on making changes e.g. challenge yourself to give more liberty to people working on projects. Or try doing a project in a different way then your normal tactics, to challenge how you work on something.
      • Anna – be kind to your self
      • Anna – give realistic deadlines – add a few working days to when you think you can actually deliver something – gives you less pressure to be stressed out on tight deadlines.
      • Sally – be prepared to be uncool – cut loose
  • Practicing gratitude

    • Anna – Celebrate the small things in life too
    • Anna – Be glad about friends, and speak to them when needed
    • Laura – Make sure you spend time to celebrate your hard work without moving on to the next task too quickly. Find a way to do this, whether it be updating your CV, sending thank you notes or taking the time in your day to say ‘that was pretty good, well done’.
    • Laura – remember to be thankful to those who helped you and say it out loud. If you’re ever feeling burnout, I like to use positive cognitive therapy which was suggested to me by a friend. This involves writing the 10 things that I’m grateful on a piece of morning, and read through it every morning and every night.d3ea2a98-5c71-4f57-9a66-ff3dc76e8d89.JPG

Our Reading List

Here is also our suggested reading list which might also help you manage your own stress:

  1. Seven Habits of Highly effective people – Stephen R Covey
  2. The road less travelled by M Scott Peck
  3. Daring Greatly by Brene Brown
  4. Braving the Wilderness by Brene Brown
  5. Poems for Grown Women
  6. How to own the room by Viv Groskop
  7. Thrive by Arianna Huffington